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Russia/Ukraine/ex-USSR

The former Soviet Union was rocked by one of the world's worst environmental disasters on April 26, 1986, when Unit 4 at the Chernobyl reactor site exploded, sending a radioactive plume across the world. The former Soviet Union is still also the site of some of the world's worst radioactive contamination from its nuclear weapons program.

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Friday
Aug202010

Fallout from Russia's fires: the ashes of Chernobyl?

A deputy for the regional parliament in Bryansk, Lyudmila Komogortseva, found that radiation levels in the burning forests were six to 12 times higher than they were before the fires began. But just as Moscow kept many of Chernobyl's victims in the dark for days about the dangers they faced — volunteer cleanup crews worked in the wreckage with their bare hands, unaware that they were being exposed to lethal doses of radiation — Russia's leaders again tried to pretend nothing was wrong. Time.

Friday
Aug062010

Fires in Russia could spread Chernobyl radioactive dust

 

The Russian Emergencies Minister is warning of possible radiation risks, as wildfires approach closer to the area affected by the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, according to Russia Today. The main fear is that the fires, which are moving further south of Moscow toward the Bryansk region, could disturb and spread the contamination buried in the ground after the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Contaminated soil could be lofted into the air and carried in the wind contaminating more areas. Multiple crews have been dispatched to try to prevent the fires spreading there.

Tuesday
Aug032010

Chernobyl zone shows decline in biodiversity

The largest wildlife census of its kind conducted in Chernobyl has revealed that mammals are declining in the exclusion zone surrounding the nuclear power reactor. It was based on almost four years of counting and studying animals there. BBC.

Sunday
Jul122009

Remembering Chernobyl 23 years on 

Twenty three years after the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in his country, Ukrainian President, Viktor Yushchenko, has announced an ambitious program to dismantle the Chernobyl nuclear complex. Unit 4 of the former Soviet nuclear power station exploded on April 26, 1986 and burned for days, lofting radioactivity around the world in what has been called the world's worst industrial accident. It will take close to $700 million in joint Ukrainian and U.S. financing to start the massive decommissioning project which Yuschenko says can be completed in 55 years including the complete dismantlement of all four reactor units. However, such predictions are likely optimistic given the nuclear industry's track record of performing chronically behind schedule and over budget.

Sunday
Jul122009

Animals in the Chernobyl "dead zone" not doing well 

The first published study to focus on the abundance of animal populations within the 36-mile diameter “dead zone” contradicts some earlier science-light research largely promoted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) that suggested wildlife populations were dramatically rebounding and that the radioactive abandoned landscape is actually a “nature reserve” for wolves, bison and bears. The more recent study by Moller and Mousseau published findings that the radioactive fallout has significantly depleted biological species including birds and insects. Moller and Mousseau also found “a high incidence” of deformed animal species.

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