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Japan

Until the Fukushima accident, Japan had 55 operating nuclear reactors as well as enrichment and reprocessing plants which had suffered a series of deadly accidents at its nuclear facilities resulting in the deaths of workers and releases of radioactivity into the environment and surrounding communities. Since the Fukushima disaster, there is growing opposition against re-opening those reactors closed for maintenance.

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Thursday
Mar142019

Beyond Nuclear on the Thom Hartmann Program re: Fukushima nuclear catastrophe

As reported on the Thom Hartmann Program: The Fukushima Daiichi Disaster, although out of the news is still irradiating Japan, the Pacific Ocean and the world. Thom interviews Beyond Nuclear's radioactive waste specialist, Kevin Kamps.

Watch the recording at this YouTube link.

Thom has interviewed Beyond Nuclear staff regularly since the Fukushima nuclear catastrophe began on March 11, 2011.

Wednesday
Feb062019

Near site of Fukushima nuclear disaster, a shattered town and scattered lives

Tuesday
Mar062018

Socializing halved mortality rate for those hit by 3/11 disaster

As reported by TSUYOSHI KAWAMURA in the Asahi Shimbun.

Of course, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear catastrophe evacuees -- many of them elderly -- increased such deadly social isolation dramatically, as residents of an entire region were scattered to the wind, landing in evacuation shelters across Japan, isolated from their former family, friends, and neighbors.

For many of those who have survived, this has gone on for seven long years now.

But as the article indicates, not all have survived, due in part to their social isolation while living in, effectively, permanent nuclear evacuation from their former homes, cut off from many to most of their loved ones.

Monday
Mar052018

SEVEN YEARS AFTER: Radioactive debris piling up at Fukushima interim facility

As reported by TETSURO TAKEHANA in the Asahi Shimbun:

FUTABA, Fukushima Prefecture--Stacks of soil and other waste contaminated by the Fukushima nuclear disaster continue to grow at an interim storage facility here.

Black bags filled with radioactive debris collected during decontamination work in various locations in the prefecture have been brought to the facility since October, when operations started.

Heavy machinery is used to stack the bags, and green sheets now cover some of the piles.

The town of Futaba co-hosts the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant. The interim facility is expected to eventually cover about 1,600 hectares [3,950 acres] of land in Futaba and Okuma, the other co-host of the plant.

The government has acquired 801 hectares as of Jan. 29, and 70 percent of that space is already covered with contaminated debris.

Negotiations between the government and landowners are continuing for the remaining hectares.

The government plans to move the contaminated debris to a final disposal site outside the prefecture by March 2045. However, it has had difficulties finding local governments willing to accept the waste.

Monday
Mar052018

SEVEN YEARS AFTER: Surprise finding in Fukushima as radiation fears increase slightly

As reported by the Asahi Shimbun, a survey shows that a significant majority of those living in/near radioactively contaminated areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant still harbor fears and concerns about numerous issues -- as rightfully they should!