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Waste Transportation

The transportation of radioactive waste already occurs, but will become frequent on our rails, roads and waterways, should irradiated reactor fuel be moved to interim or permanent dump sites.

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Wednesday
Feb222017

Iroquois Caucus condemns plan to truck highly radioactive liquid from Chalk River

I R O Q U O I S  C A U C U S
 
Kahnawà:ke   Kanehsatá:ke    Akwesáhsne    Tyendinaga    Wahta    Six Nations of the Grand River    Oneida Nation of the Thames
 
Iroquois Caucus condemns plan to truck highly radioactive liquid from Chalk River 
 
For immediate release

(February 22, 2017)  The Iroquois Caucus announced today that it is unanimously condemning a plan to truck 23,000 liters of highly radioactive liquid from Chalk River, Ontario across the International border to the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, using public roads and bridges. 
 
This unprecedented action could have a devastating impact on the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence River ecosystem. Depending on the route(s) chosen, there is the potential for a spill or spills into waterways flowing into the Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence River or one of their many tributaries.
 
This ecosystem provides drinking water for an estimated 40 million people on both sides of the border. 
 
“We have stated clearly in the past that we will not stand idly by,” stated Chief Don Maracle of the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte. “The seven communities of the Iroquois Caucus stand together in the protection of Mother Earth.”
 
“It is appalling that such reckless and irresponsible plans are given approval by the regulators and the Courts when far more sensible solutions are at hand,” added Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Simon.
 
“The Iroquois Caucus is well aware that liquid of a very similar nature has been routinely solidified and stored at Chalk River since 2003,” explained Kahnawà:ke Grand Chief Joseph Tokwiro Norton. “There are processes already in existence to ‘down-blend’ the liquid in order to eliminate highly-enriched uranium by converting it into low-enriched uranium.”
 
“We strongly encourage that all persons, communities and organizations that share our concerns stand together to ensure that common sense prevails,” concluded Akwesasne Grand Chief Abram Benedict. “There is no reason to continue with a plan that puts 40 million people at risk when alternatives readily exist.”
 
The Iroquois Caucus consists of elected Councils from Akwesasne, Kahnawà:ke, Kanesatake, Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte (Tyendinaga), Oneida Nation of the Thames, Six Nations of the Grand River and the Wahta Mohawks.  -30-
 
Contact: Trevor Bomberry, Coordinator   Joe Delaronde, Political Press Attaché Iroquois Caucus     Mohawk Council of Kahnawà:ke 519-761-7694, ic.coordinator@sixnations.ca  450-632-7500, joe.delaronde@mck.ca

Thursday
Feb162017

Sarnia mayor worries nuclear waste could travel through city

As reported by the Sarnia Observer.

As explained by Dr. Gordon Edwards of Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility, such high-risk, highly radioactive LIQUID waste shipments are unprecedented in North American -- and perpahs even worldwide -- history.

Tuesday
Feb072017

Nuclear waste to travel through Ontario to the U.S.

Friday
Feb032017

Federal judge paves the way for controversial shipments [of highly radioactive liquid waste] to roll

As reported by WIVB in Buffalo, NY.

(Includes interview with Beyond Nuclear, a co-plaintiff in the lawsuit that sought to prevent the shipments. Attorneys Terry Lodge of Toledo, and Diane Curran of Washington, D.C., serve as the environmental coalition's legal counsel.)

Friday
Feb032017

Francophone Ontario t.v. coverage of highly radioactive liquid waste truck shipments court ruling

As reported by Le Téléjournal Ontario:

This broadcast in French (with two interviews in English) describes the dangers of the liquid nuclear waste shipments from Chalk River, with some special emphasis on the fruit-growing and wine-producing Niagara peninsula.  It is the lead story, but you have to tolerate a few commercials. (Cette émission en français (avec 2 entrevues en anglais) décrit les dangers associés avec les transports des déchets nucléaires sous forme liquide en provenance de Chalk River, avec une emphase particulière sur le région du péninsule de Niagara où on produit beaucoup des fruits et des vins. C’est l’histoire principal, mais il faut tolérer quelques publicités.)