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Waste Transportation

The transportation of radioactive waste already occurs, but will become frequent on our rails, roads and waterways, should irradiated reactor fuel be moved to interim or permanent dump sites.

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Tuesday
Mar262019

3/25 & 3/26--In Nebraska: Mobile Chernobyls? Floating Fukushimas? Three Mile Islands in Transport?

USE for News Release NFP Logo & There Can Be No Peace Without Justice 2016.png

Nebraskans for Peace

There Can Be No Peace Without Justice

 

News Advisory - for Immediate Release

 

In Nebraska: Mobile Chernobyls? Floating Fukushimas? Three Mile Islands in Transport?

 

The Risks of Shipping High-Level Radioactive Waste through Omaha, Lincoln and Nebraska

 

Contacts: Kevin Kamps, Beyond Nuclear, 240-462-3216, kevin@beyondnuclear.org

 

Mark Welsch, Omaha Coordinator for Nebraskans for Peace 402-510-7565 NFPOmaha1970@gmail.com

 

Tim Rinne, State Coordinator for Nebraskans for Peace (in Lincoln) 402-730-6675

 

Just days before the 40th anniversary of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 atomic reactor meltdown (March 28, 1979), join us for a discussion of the high risks of proposed shipments of irradiated nuclear fuel through Lincoln, Omaha and all of Nebraska, and learn how Nebraskans can help prevent it. There are plans to ship some high-level nuclear waste on the Missouri River to Omaha NE.

 

TWO Free Events, open to the public - Monday and Tuesday, in Lincoln and Omaha

 

Monday, March 25, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

The Unitarian Church of Lincoln

6300 A Street, Lincoln NE

 

Tuesday, March 26, 2019 7pm – 8:30pm

UNO - Community Engagement Center

Rooms 201/205

6001 Dodge Street, Omaha NE

Free parking is available in Lot E - between the clock tower and library - and in all other parking lots on campus.

Just days before the 40th anniversary of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 atomic reactor meltdown (March 28, 1979), join us for a discussion of the high risks of proposed shipments of irradiated nuclear fuel through Lincoln, Omaha and all of Nebraska, and learn how Nebraskans can help prevent it. There are plans to ship some high-level nuclear waste on the Missouri River to Omaha NE.

 

TWO Free Events, open to the public - Monday and Tuesday, in Lincoln and Omaha

 

Monday, March 25, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

The Unitarian Church of Lincoln

6300 A Street, Lincoln NE

 

Tuesday, March 26, 2019 7pm – 8:30pm

UNO - Community Engagement Center

Rooms 201/205

6001 Dodge Street, Omaha NE

Free parking is available in Lot E - between the clock tower and library - and in all other parking lots on campus.

 

In addition to plenty of Q&A and discussion time, the 90-minute program will include:

 

In Lincoln, an inflatable, full-scale replica of a highly radioactive waste Legal Weight Truck-sized shipping cask will be deployed outside the event.

 

A presentation by Kevin Kamps, Radioactive Waste Specialist, Beyond Nuclear, addressing the safety and security risks of transporting highly radioactive wastes, and irradiated nuclear fuel, on the roads, rails, and waterways, as proposed in legislation currently pending before the U.S. Congress.

 

He will also discuss the risks of nuclear waste indoor wet storage pool fires for the entire region, and the interim alternative of Hardened On-Site Storage (HOSS), as well as the need to stop generating high-level radioactive waste.

 

Unfortunately, the Cooper (Nuclear) Station in Nebraska, a Fukushima twin design on the Missouri River, has been rubber-stamped for an extension by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for 60 years of operations, until the year 2034.

 

An animation, prepared by Scott Portzline, Security Consultant, Three Mile Island Alert (TMIA), about radioactive waste transport risks, will be shown. So too will a 90-second aerial drone-captured video, featuring transport routes in Pennsylvania. A short informational video, “Nuclear Transports – Eye-Witness to Rule-breaking,” also prepared by Portzline, will be shown. Lessons learned from Pennsylvania’s TMI meltdown survivors will be applied to radioactive risks in Nebraska.

Nebraskans for Peace will share information on how to get involved locally.

 

Events are co-hosted by:
Beyond Nuclear; Lincoln Chapter of Nebraskans for Peace; Omaha Chapter of Nebraskans for Peace; National Association of Social Workers, Nebraska Chapter; Antelope Park Church of the Brethren and other groups.

 

- - - -

Nebraskans for Peace is the oldest statewide Peace & Justice organization in the United States. Building upon the long tradition of peacemaking in Nebraska, NFP has continually advocated for dialogue and peaceful resolution of conflicts, while steadfastly promoting the rights of all people throughout its decades-long history.

Thursday
Mar212019

3/21, Kansas City, MO: Beyond Nuclear speak will address risks of radioactive waste shipments across Missouri

PeaceWorks, Kansas City
4509 Walnut, KC MO 64111
PeaceWorksKC.org, 816-561-1181
PeaceWorksKC@gmail.com and on Facebook: PeaceWorksKC

For immediate release: March 21, 2019

Contacts: Kevin Kamps, 240-462-3216, Kevin@BeyondNuclear.org, and Henry Stoever, 913-375-0045, HenryStoever@sbcglobal.net


Fukushima freeways? Mobile Chernobyls? 
Three Mile Islands in transit?
Speaker will explore risks of radioactive shipping across Missouri

 

An educational presentation about the proposed plan to ship high-level radioactive waste through Missouri will be conducted by Beyond Nuclear’s radioactive waste specialist Kevin Kamps as part of his multi-state tour. Kamps will give his talk, with Q&A, 7-8:30 pm Thursday, March 21, at the Rime Buddhist Center, 700 W. Pennway, KC MO. Kamps’ topic: “Will America’s Nuclear Waste Problem Be Passing Through Missouri?”

Cosponsored by the Rime Buddhist Center and PeaceWorks, KC, Kamps will warn that if the high-level radioactive waste dump site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, were to open, 3,574 rail-sized casks on trains and/or heavy-haul trucks would travel through Missouri toward the Nevada site. Seventy-five percent of the country’s commercial atomic reactors are east of the Mississippi, and Missouri would be among states harder hit than others in terms of radioactive shipment numbers.

Missouri also has the distinction, says information from Beyond Nuclear, of being downstream from potential large shipments of high-level radioactive waste from Cooper Nuclear Power Plant (in Nebraska, on the Missouri state line) up the Missouri River into the port of Omaha.


Pending legislation, such as the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (H.R. 3053 in the past congressional session), could expedite the opening of the Yucca Mountain dump, according to Beyond Nuclear. That would significantly increase the quantity of waste that could be buried in Nevada, correspondingly increasing shipments across Missouri. The Yucca Mountain site would be limited to 70,000 metric tons of high-level radioactive waste burial.


But, according to Beyond Nuclear, so-called centralized interim storage facilities (CISFs) in New Mexico and/or Texas could mean even larger shipment numbers through Missouri. New Mexico’s CISF has applied for 173,600 metric tons of irradiated nuclear fuel storage capacity. Texas’s CISF has applied for another 40,000 metric tons. The CISFs have proposed opening and commencing shipments by the early 2020s.


Kamps plans to display an inflatable, full-scale replica of a highly radioactive waste Legal Weight Truck-sized shipping cask. He will show several short videos, including some prepared for the 40th annual commemoration of the Three Mile Island reactor meltdown March 28.


http://www.state.nv.us/nucwaste/news2017/ymroutes17.png The map shows KC as the hub for six rail routes to Yucca Mountain under consideration in 2008 by the US Department of Energy.


http://www.state.nv.us/nucwaste/news2017/pdf/Congressional_Districts_Affected.pdf The 2017 report would designate up to 70,000 metric tons of radioactive waste to be shipped to Yucca Mountain, including 3,574 shipments passing through Missouri, with KC as the hub.

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Wednesday
Mar202019

Will America’s Nuclear Waste Problem Be Passing through MO, KS, and NE?

Beyond Nuclear's radioactive waste specialist, Kevin Kamps, is on a speaking tour in Missouri, Kansas, and Nebraska, addressing the risks of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) transportation. (See links to his presentations, media interviews, etc., below.)

Centralized interim storage facilities in New Mexico and Texas propose commencing large-scale HLRW shipments (by road, rail, and/or waterway) in the early 2020s; the permanent dump targeted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is still coveted by U.S. House Republicans like John Shimkus (IL) and Fred Upton (MI). Any one or more of these dumps opening would launch unprecedented thousands of truck, train, and/or barge shipments of HLRW across most states. Missouri, Kansas, and Nebraska would be hard hit, as mostly Eastern HLRWs would travel through, for dumping in the Southwest. (90% of reactors, and HLRW, are in the eastern half of the U.S.; 75% are east of the Mississippi River.)

As March 28, 2019 marks the 40th annual commemoration of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 meltdown near Harrisburg, PA, it is especially important to learn the lessons, and hear the cautionary tales, from survivors of that disaster -- including what they have to say about the risks of high-level radioactive waste transportation.

See the following three videos/animations, prepared as part of a press conference held in the PA state capitol builiding, conducted by Beyond Nuclear and Three Mile Island Alert on 10/2/2018 (an earlier HLRW transport risk speaking tour stop, which also addressed reactor safety issues):

See a 2.5 minute video entitled "Radioactive Waste Transport Risks in Pennsylvania," showing transport road and rail routes for irradiated nuclear fuel shipments by heavy-haul truck and train, from the Peach Bottom and Three Mile Island nuclear power plants. The video was captured by drone, and shows an aerial perspective on the shipment routes. (As shown in the aerial imagery, and as documented in the 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Yucca Mountain, Nevada High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement map in Appendix G, Figure G-36, Page G-128, as compared to a GIS rail and road network, the heavy-haul truck road route from Peach Bottom is on State Route 74, from Lower Chanceford, to Red Lion, to Dallastown, to York, where the irradiated nuclear fuel shipping containers would be loaded onto the Norfolk Southern railway; in the case of TMI, the irradiated nuclear fuel would use the Norfolk Southern railroad. A special thank you to Dr. Fred Dilger for documenting and confirming all of this in his 2017 documents, posted at the very top of the State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Project's web site.) 

Watch "Eye-Witness to Rule-Breaking," a 2-minute video prepared by Scott Portzline, documenting both low-level and high-level radioactive waste transport incidents he observed with his own eyes, in and around his home in Harrisburg, PA.

Watch a 1-mintue animation entitled "Nuclear Waste Transport," also prepared by Portzline.

And along those lines, read an article, "Mobile Meltdown: TMI Train Troubles," written by Kay Drey and Kevin Kamps (currently serving as Beyond Nuclear's board president, and radioactive waste specialist, respectively), which was published in the NIRS/WISE Nuclear Monitor at the time of the TMI Unit 2 meltdown's 25th annual commemoration in 2004.

All of these lessons learned from TMI, and PA, can and should be applied elsewhere, as in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, and beyond.

See Kevin's power point presentation given at the University of Missouri in Columbia on Tuesday, March 19th.

Kevin was interviewed on Columbia's community radio station, KOPN, on March 19th, from 6-7pm, on the program "Evening Edition."

Kevin presented to a peace studies class at UM in Columbia on March 20th.

The speaking tour moves on to Kansas City, MO on Thursday, March 21st. The presentation will from 7-8:30pm, at the Rime Buddhist Center, 700 W. Pennway, Kansas City, MO.

On Friday, March 22nd, Kevin will be in Lawrence, KS. The presentation will be from 5-7pm, at the First Presbyterian Church, 2415 Clinton Parkway, Lawrence, KS 66047. This event is sponsored by LETUS (Lawrence Ecology Teams United in Sustainability), the Lawrence Coalition for Peace and Justice (LCPJ), and Sustainability Action Network.

The next events will be in Nebraska, in Lincoln on Monday, March 25th (at the Unitarian Church of Lincoln, 6300 A Street), and in Omaha on Tuesday, March 26th (at UNO - Community Engagement Center, Rooms 201/205, 6001 Dodge Street, Omaha NE; Free parking is available in Lot E - between the clock tower and library - and in all other parking lots on campus).

The final event will be in St. Louis, MO on Monday, April 1st. The event will begin at 7pm. It will be held at Schlafly's Tap Room. For more info., see links below:

Blog post on Great River Environmental Law Center website: https://greatriverslaw.org/2019/03/17/join-us-for-nuclear-fools-day-on-april-1st

 

RSVP Form: https://goo.gl/forms/RmnFWUlW3bImULex1

Tuesday
Jan152019

What if nuclear waste had been aboard?!

This June 29, 2016 coverage of a fiery disaster, "Video capture massive train collisin in Texas Panhandle that left 3 presumed dead," begs the question long asked by NIRS: What if nuclear waste had been aboard?!

If the irradiated nuclear fuel centralized interim storage facilities targeted at TX and NM, it means nuke waste shipments in very large numbers passing thru this same area.

Tuesday
Dec042018

Nevada Balks at Feds’ Plan to Transport Plutonium for Storage Near Vegas

As reported by Paul Roupe at Courthouse News.

The one metric ton of plutonium is weapons-grade. The targeted storage site is the so-called Nevada National Security Site, formerly called the Nevada Test Site.

Full-scale nuclear weapons were detonated at the NTS between 1951 and 1992 (including more than a decade of above-ground testing; one-third of underground tests nonetheless leaked to the atmosphere), resulting in countless cases of disease and death downwind.

The NNSS is located in Newe Sogobia, Western Shoshone Indian land, as acknowledged by the "peace and friendship" Treaty of Ruby Valley, signed by the U.S. government in 1863.

The NNSS is also located near Yucca Mountain, also long targeted -- for the permanent dumping of high-level radioactive waste from both commercial atomic reactors, as well as the DOE nuclear weapons complex.

A major aspect of Nevada's lawsuit challenges the U.S. Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration's lack of transportation safety and security planning, a violation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).